Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Blast-off to a Great School Year



BLAST-OFF TO A GREAT SCHOOL YEAR


Blast Off to a Great School  Year

ToT is having a great Back-to-School BOOST Sale.
It's today, August 20, 2014.

Click Here


Enter the code BOOST at checkout at receive up to 28% off on selected products.
All my Simple Steps to Sentence Sense books and products are 28% off.


While you are there, check out the great products for elememtary grades, too. Visit my good friend, at the Wise Owl Factory Store. Click here.


Make this year your very best yet!

All the best,


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Thursday, August 7, 2014

6 Confusing Words to Master

Here are 6 confusing words to master when you write. Although they sound very much alike, they have different meanings.

Tess' Tips 6 Confusing Words to Master


Dying – means that a living being is no longer alive. Dying is the present participle of the verb die.
Examples: I am just dying to see your new car. The poor man is dying of a horrible disease.
Dyeing - means to change the color of something by using a dye.
Examples:  Mother is dyeing her hair brown to hide the gray hairs. Jane is dyeing her shoes to match her dress.

Weather – means changes in the atmospheric condition.
Examples: We need to check the weather before we set sail. The weather is warm and dry today.
Whether – is used to indicate possibilities or choices .
Example: He was not sure whether or not to eat the sushi.
Whether - also means if something is or was true.
Example: Will you find out whether or not they want to go with us to the movie?
HINT: When choosing between weather and whether, be sure to pronounce the “h” in whether. If you are talking about clouds, rain, etc, choose weather. There is no “h” sound in weather.

Advice – is a noun that means an opinion or suggestion that one gives to another.
Advise – is a verb that means to give an opinion or suggestion.
HINT: Try substituting the word feedback into the sentence. If it makes sense, choose the noun advice.
Example A: I need your (advice, advise) on how long my speech should be.
I need your (feedback) on how long my speech should be.
Since you could substitute the word feedback in this sentence, choose advice.
Example B:  You need to (advice, advise) me on how long my speech should be.
You need to (feedback) me on how long my speech should be.
Since you could not substitute the word feedback in this sentence, choose advise.

Click here for a free lesson and exercise on correctly using these 6 confusing words.

Be sure to visit my store for more free lessons and take a look at my Simple Steps to Sentence books. Help your students learn grammar and usage the easy way.

All the best,

photo and signature Charlene Tess

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Saturday, August 2, 2014

Back to School Sale by Super Secondary Teachers


WOW! Here are the 37 members of the Super Secondary Teachers Group on TeachersPayTeachers.com as we looked in "back in the day" in our yearbooks. My photo was taken when I was a senior in high school. I won't tell you how long ago that really was. All of us have changed a bit, but some things haven't. We love teaching and we love to create products that secondary students will love. During the Back-to-School Sale, you can find amazing products from all of these teachers at up to 28% off. Just visit TeachersPayTeachers.com on August 4th and 5th and enter the Promo Code BTS14 at checkout. You could get up to a 28% discount.

Visit any or all of our stores and see the fantastic bargains on our best products.


Links to the other Super Secondary Teachers' store are listed below:

Addie Williams   http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Addie-Williams
21st Century Math Projects  http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/21st-Century-Math-Projects

The Career Ready Teacher Http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Missy-Emerine

A huge thank you to Danielle Weinburg Knight for the Yearbook Sales Graphic above.


Have a great beginning to your school year! Check back often. We add new products every day.


All the best,



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Thursday, June 19, 2014

Beware of Creating Sweeping Generalizations

Beware of Creating Sweeping Generalizations

Tess' Tips Beware of Creating Sweeping Generalizations


This is the third post in a series about the comparison of adjectives and adverbs. If you missed the first two posts, click here and here.

When using the superlative degree, it is important to avoid creating sweeping generalizations.

A sweeping generalization creates a statement that is too broad. 

The superlative degree is created by adding est to some words, or adding the word most.
For example: happiest or most enjoyable

When you add est or use the word most, it is easy to create a sweeping statement that goes too far in its description.

Examples:

Sweeping Generalization: Benjamin Franklin was the most brilliant of all inventors.
Better: Benjamin Franklin was one of the most brilliant of all inventors.

Sweeping Generalization: Terry Bradshaw was the greatest of all quarterbacks in football history.
Better: Terry Bradshaw is considered by many one of the greatest of all quarterbacks in football history.

It's important not to get carried away with the superlative degree and say way more than you intended to say. Use qualifying words to make the superlative degree more acceptable.

I hope you have a restful summer. Check back here most Thursdays for more tips on grammar and usage.

Visit my store for more helpful lessons on grammar and usage.

All the best,
Charlene Tess' photo and signature


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Thursday, June 12, 2014

Avoid Comparing Adjectives That Are Absolute

Avoid Comparing Adjectives That Are Absolute


This post is a continuation of the tips I discussed last Thursday about avoiding errors in adjective and adverb comparisons. Click here if you missed it.

Today, we are going to take a look at adjectives that are absolute in their meaning, and they cannot be compared by using the comparative or superlative degree. Absolute adjectives stand alone.

Usually, when two things are being compared we use the comparative degree.  When more than two things are being compared, we use the superlative degree. Sometimes, however, the meaning of an adjective is absolute, and it cannot be compared.

Some examples of absolute adjectives include: absolute, round, straight, square, perfect, and unique.

Incorrect: My score on the exam was more perfect than anyone else’s.
Correct: My score on the exam was perfect.

Probably the most abused of these words is the adjective unique.
By definition it means there is only one of its kind, so it cannot be compared to another.

Incorrect: Your story was more unique than mine.
Correct: Your story was unique.

A less frequently used definition of the word unique is unusual. If, when you use the word unique, you mean that something is unusual, it is all right to compare it.

It would be better, however, to simply use the word unusual.

Next week, we will take a look at adjectives in the superlative degree that create sweeping generalizations. A sweeping generalization creates a statement that is too broad. 

For more information on the comparison of adjectives and adverbs, read my previous post.

I hope you are having one of the best summer vacations ever! 

Check back here most Thursdays for more of Tess' Tips.


Visit my store for more helpful lessons in grammar and usage. Many of the lessons are free. 

All the best,

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Thursday, June 5, 2014

How to Use Comparison Correctly



This tip will hopefully help you avoid errors when you are using adjectives and adverbs to compare things.

We frequently use adjectives and adverbs to compare two or more things in our writing.  When two things are being compared, use the comparative degree. When more than two things are being compared, use the superlative degree.

Some words use er and est to form the comparative and superlative degree.
Some words add the words more and most.
Negative comparisons use the words less and least.

Positive Degree         Comparative Degree             Superlative Degree
cheap                          cheaper                                cheapest
recent                         more recent                          most recent
expensive                   less expensive                      least expensive

The important thing is never to use both of these devices at the same time. In other words, do not use: er and more together; or est and most together.

Correct:  The older of my two sons is the one you met yesterday.
Incorrect:  The more older of my two sons is the one you met yesterday.

Correct:  The healthier you are, the better you look.
Incorrect:  The more healthier you are, the better you look.

If you are not sure of the correct spelling when writing a comparison structure, use a dictionary or look up the word online.

In my post next week, I will discuss adjectives that are absolute and cannot be compared. 


I hope your summer is sunny and bright!

All the best,




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